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Seattle Doctors, Neurologists & Headache Specialists

I’ve been asked about Seattle headache specialists and neurologists more times than I can count in the last month. My experience is quite limited, but the online support group and forum has a thread with recommendations for Seattle headache doctors. If you have any to add, please do! You can also check What Do You Think of Your Doctor, an earlier post with lots of good suggestions, some in Seattle, some elsewhere.

Here’s what I know:

I’ve seen Sylvia Lucas at UW and Sheena Aurora at Swedish. They are both kind and caring. We all click with different people, of course, but I found Dr. Lucas to be more patient-oriented and Dr. Aurora to be more research-oriented. Both have at least three-month long waiting lists. It took six months to get into my first appointment with Dr. Lucas and follow-ups are usually scheduled two months out. Dr. Aurora is more like three months for an initial appointment.

A friend sees Patrick Hogan, an osteopathic neurologist, in Tacoma. His number is (253) 284-4488. He requires a doctor’s referral regardless of your insurance and your family/general physician will have to contact his office to get you in.

For other doctors in the Seattle area — or anywhere else in the US, check the National Headache Foundation’s physician finder or the American Headache Society’s health care provider search.

8/14/14: Many readers have lamented Dr. Elena Robinson‘s move to Vancouver. She’s back in Seattle and is in practice with the University of Washington.

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Is Seeing a Specialist Always Best?

When people ask me about finding a doctor, I almost invariably tell them to see a headache specialist. Seeing someone with headache-specific knowledge is important because headache disorder education isn’t widespread. But is seeing a specialist always the best idea?

Dr. Aniruddha Malpani of The Patient’s Doctor writes:

Most patients want to go to the doctor who has special expertise in handling their particular problem. They will spend a lot of time and energy tracking down the “biggest name in the field” – and then leave everything up to the doctor. This can often be a short-sighted approach, because specialists are biased, and it’s important to be aware of this bias.

While it’s true that an expert has a lot of experience in dealing with a particular problem, this extensive experience also introduces all sorts of bias in the way he handles this particular problem. There are many reasons for this.

Because he is used to seeing complex cases which have been referred to him, he often cannot deal with simple bread and butter problems ! He also sees life through a distorted lens, and may not be able to see the big picture. Because he cannot afford to make mistakes, he often overtests and overtreats. He often asks for esoteric and expensive (and painful) tests, to differentiate himself from the other ordinary doctors. He also usually bad-mouths alternative options of dealing with the problem – after all, this is his competition! He is reluctant to refer cases which he cannot handle, because this would damage his aura of omnipotence and omniscience.

Often, in the pursuit of narrow goals, he loses objectivity; and is more interested in doing research rather than treating patients. Many experts are so used to seeing only sick patients, that they often cannot recognize a normal variant!

What do you think? Let us know in the comments below or on the online support group and forum.

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Choosing & Getting the Most From a Doc

Choosing a new doctor is always tough. Recommendations from family and friends can only go so far. We’ve all got different ideas about what makes a good doc and our expectations aren’t the same. And it’s likely that friends can’t give you the name of a specialist that you need, like a neurologist.

Case in point, I love my new headache specialist and tell that to everyone who’s looking for one in the Seattle area. Most people I’ve talked to agree, but some disagree — vehemently.

In My Humble Opinion has a a doc’s suggestions for finding the right general practitioner for you and getting the most out of that relationship. Having a good GP has proven invaluable for me. I’ve gotten the first level of headache care — which I recommend everyone new to headache tries — and referrals to specialists.

(A caveat: I’ve heard horror stories about seeing a specialist of another doc’s recommendation. I tend to think that if you have a doctor that you really like — be it a GP or specialist — you’re much more likely to get a good referral. But I could be naive.)

Although the post is specifically about finding a GP, the suggestions can also apply to choosing any specialist. Check out my earlier post too if you’re looking for tips on finding a headache doctor.

[via this week’s Grand Rounds]