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Farm Wife, Nana

This is a reader-submitted story.

1. My diagnosis is: chronic migraine without aura
2. My migraine attack frequency is: 3 -6 month
3. I was diagnosed in: 1980
4. My comorbid conditions include: depression, arthritis
5. I take __2__ medications/supplements each day for prevention and ___4_ medications/supplements to treat an acute attack (not all at once)
6. My first migraine attack was: when I was pregnant at 19
7. My most disabling migraine symptoms are: pain
8. My strangest migraine symptoms are: fatigue
9. My biggest migraine triggers are: MSG, bright sunlight, extreme heat or cold.
10. I know a migraine attack is coming on when:
11. The most frustrating part about having a migraine attack is: missing out on fun with family
12. During a migraine attack, I worry most about: how long it will last and if the medication will work.
13. When I think about migraine between attacks, I think: when will the next one be? How can I plan?
14. When I tell someone I have migraine, the response is usually: sympathy…
15. When someone tells me they have migraine, I think: how horrible for you!
16. When I see commercials about migraine treatments, I think: should I ask my dr about this or is it a hoax?
17. My best coping tools are: prayer, sleep, darkness, quiet
18. I find comfort in: a soft blanket, scripture
19. I get angry when people say: you just need to drink more water
20. I like it when people say: you must be a strong person to have raised. 6 children while suffering migraines .
21. Something kind someone can do for me during a migraine attack is: massage my neck.
22. The best thing(s) a doctor has ever said to me about migraine is: we just have to try different things until we find what works for you. But we Will help you.
23. The hardest thing to accept about having migraine is: it is unpredictable.
24. Migraine has taught me: life cannot be planned 100%
25. The quotation, motto, mantra, or scripture that gets me through an attack is: “Bless The Lord, O My Soul, and all that is with in me praise His Holy name”
26. If I could go back to the early days of my diagnosis, I would tell myself: this will be a journey
27. The people who support me most are: my husband!
28. The thing I most wish people understood about migraine is: just how painful it is
29. Migraine and Headache Awareness Month is important to me because: it recognizes the importance of my condition .
30. One more thing I’d like to say about life with migraine is: it is much better because of preventative medication. I hoped they would stop after hysterectomy but didn’t. So I may always have them?

MHAMgiveawayReader-submitted stories solely represent the personal point of view, experience, and opinion of the author, not of The Daily Headache or Kerrie Smyres. Follow this link to learn how to share YOUR 30 Things about living with a headache disorder.

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Author, Public Speaker and Migraine Warrior

This is a reader-submitted story.

1. My diagnosis is: Chronic Severe Migraine with Aura and Episodic Hemiplegic Migraine

2. My migraine attack frequency is: I have migraine almost daily, either via a new episode or an extended one that stretches over a 48-72 hour period

3. I was diagnosed in: 1996 I was diagnosed by my primary physician; however, it wasn’t until summer 2003 that I had my first hemiplegic episode and the following year, 2004, one of the top neurologists in the US diagnosed me as “Chronic Severe” and told me that the bad headaches I experienced off and on as a child for a few years in the early 1970’s (I used to sometimes get headaches so bad that I could barely function; and the Dr kept saying maybe I needed glasses! after a 2nd visit, the eye dr said “he has 20/20 vision; stop bringing him here wasting your money!) were actually migraines; but in those days, he said Drs rarely ever diagnosed children with migraines.

4. My comorbid conditions include: Depression. It gets really bad!

5. I take _3___ medications/supplements each day for prevention and __2__ medications/supplements to treat an acute attack. Over the course of the past 11 years of my migraine journey, I’ve tried 7 different prevention meds and 6 different treatment meds. Some worked for a while then stopped; and some never worked at all.

6. My first migraine attack was: as I explained above, it was actually around age 6, in 1970

7. My most disabling migraine symptoms are: Head pain and throbbing; neck stiffness; tingling/numbness; extreme fatigue; nausea; very sensitive to lights and smells; and over the past year, I’ve begun experiencing Vertigo, I also find my concentration and focus is severely diminished

8. My strangest migraine symptoms are: Cravings and more cravings; constantly thirsty!

9. My biggest migraine triggers are: certain lighting; ANY trace of cigarette smoke; smells certain cooked foods (esp. eggs and hot coffee); that’s just for starters; not to mention stress and aggravation

10. I know a migraine attack is coming on when: the back of my neck begins to stiffen, and the back of my neck at the base just below/in the indentation of my head begins to pulsate; at that point, I know its ON! often times this will occur before an aura.

11. The most frustrating part about having a migraine attack is: having to completely alter a day; either thru decreased productivity or total shutdown

12. During a migraine attack, I worry most about: how much further I’m falling behind; and how I have to cancel something planned with my children and/or family

13. When I think about migraine between attacks, I think: I’m grateful for a pain-free moment or day; lets play catch up!

14. When I tell someone I have migraine, the response is usually: I’m sorry to hear that.

15. When someone tells me they have migraine, I think: I only hear this from a few people who call a “bad headache” a migraine; so I try to be empathetic, but knowing almost for certain that they have NEVER had a migraine. They have no clue.

16. When I see commercials about migraine treatments, I think: Been there, done that; next?!

17. My best coping tools are: rest, quiet, more rest and just disconnecting from people and things as much as possible

18. I find comfort in: some of my family members and a few close friends that get it! also, knowing that I’ve always found a way to bounce back, even from the worst episodes, ER visits, hospitalizations, etc.

19. I get angry when people say: Oh, I get bad headaches sometimes too. Or when they want to suggest every “Grandmas remedy” or other “cure”, (oils, foods, sleep techniques, clothing!…………..) most all of which I’ve already tried at some point.

20. I like it when people say: “I can’t imagine what you’re going through; if there’s anything I can do, let me know.” I always appreciate that.

21. Something kind someone can do for me during a migraine attack is: Allow me space to just “be”, and not take it personal if I seem aloof or detached.

22. The best thing(s) a doctor has ever said to me about migraine is:We’ll keep trying til we find some relief for you.

23. The hardest thing to accept about having migraine is: its the ONLY health challenge I have, yet, its disrupted much of my adult life and has impacted me financially.

24. Migraine has taught me: the value of being appreciative and accepting what I can’t control; and most importantly, the value of time!! Be as productive as you can be, on the good days, as they are not promised.

25. The quotation, motto, mantra, or scripture that gets me through an attack is: It hasn’t killed me yet, so truly I am stronger. I don’t “suffer” from migraines; I am a “migraine warrior”,

26. If I could go back to the early days of my diagnosis, I would tell myself: prepare for this to get worse before it gets any better

27. The people who support me most are: my family members, including my best friend and confidant who is not a “blood relative”

28. The thing I most wish people understood about migraine is: It’s not “just a bad headache”, and I truly have no control of it, and migraine disease has no rhyme or reason. The brain is beyond complex!

29. Migraine and Headache Awareness Month is important to me because: It raises awareness and moves us closer towards a public conversation and acceptance of migraine disease as a “thing” within the mainstream society.

30. One more thing I’d like to say about life with migraine is: Be grateful to the Creator for each pain-free day you have, each family member and friend who gets it, and certainly for each employer,director/ manager/supervisor, teacher, business associate, etc., who also gets it. Sad reality is, they are few and far between

 
MHAMgiveawayReader-submitted stories solely represent the personal point of view, experience, and opinion of the author, not of The Daily Headache or Kerrie Smyres. Follow this link to learn how to share YOUR 30 Things about living with a headache disorder.

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Debbie’s Migraine Life

<em>This is a reader-submitted story.</em>

1. My diagnosis is: Chronic migraine

2. My migraine attack frequency is: Often daily, sometimes 15-20 migraine days per month

3. I was diagnosed in: My early 20’s I am in my late 40’s now

4. My comorbid conditions include: Neck and back pain

5. I take 2-3 medications/supplements each day for prevention and 2-3 medications/supplements to treat an acute attack

6. My first migraine attack was: Twenty some years ago due to hormonal fluctuations

7. My most disabling migraine symptoms are: Confusion, head and neck pain, pain, blurred vision, nausea

8. My strangest migraine symptoms are: Blurred vision, somewhat of an aura of nauseating blechhh feeling before any headache symptoms.

9. My biggest migraine triggers are: Wine, food, sleep, heat, certain smells, pulled back hairstyles, certain bras

10. I know a migraine attack is coming on when: A wave of nausea comes over me, followed a while later by sharp pain behind my eye

11. The most frustrating part about having a migraine attack is: Not being able to participate fully, missing work or trying to participate with work or family activities while feeling awful.

12. During a migraine attack, I worry most about: Disappointing my family

13. When I think about migraine between attacks, I think: About how much I appreciate feeling well.

14. When I tell someone I have migraine, the response is usually: Some recommendation of OTC medicine to try.

15. When someone tells me they have migraine, I think: I respond with compassion and empathy.

16. When I see commercials about migraine treatments: I usually have tried it already! Also, while I like the idea of not missing out on things, rest is still important during a migraine flare. The commercials will have you think that you will be running through a field of daisies with your children without missing a beat.

17. My best coping tools are: Abortive meds.

18. I find comfort in: Pajamas, some quiet couch time.

19. I get angry when people say: You really need to figure out about these headaches. Ummm.. ok!

20. I like it when people say: I am so sorry, can I get you anything?

21. Something kind someone can do for me during a migraine attack is: Offer to fix something quick to eat so that I can keep my meds down.

22. The best thing(s) a doctor has ever said to me about migraine is: There are a lot of things we can try. Also, that many women get better after menopause.

23. The hardest thing to accept about having migraine is: That I need to take a break from whatever is going on, and include rest in my treatment along with the abortive meds. I tend to just keep on going.

24. Migraine has taught me: To be compassionate towards others with chronic illnesses. Also, that today may be a bad day, but tomorrow will be better.

25. The quotation, motto, mantra, or scripture that gets me through an attack is: This too shall pass.

26. If I could go back to the early days of my diagnosis, I would tell myself: Find a neurologist who is a headache specialist and start trying different treatments.

27. The people who support me most are: My husband, kids and dogs.

28. The thing I most wish people understood about migraine is: Migraine is a chronic neurological illness that affects the entire body.

29. Migraine and Headache Awareness Month is important to me because: It reminds me that I am not alone in this.

30. One more thing I’d like to say about life with migraine is: Chronic migraine affects the entire body. Sometimes it feels like something horrible is really wrong, like a stroke or worse. I am trying to accept this as a chronic illness, and learn my limitations, and how to handle my bad days so that maybe I will be back to my good days faster. One thing that is very frustrating is dealing with the insurance company in getting the proper amount of medication to treat the amount of migraines that I have. If I could schedule fewer headaches per month, I certainly would but the thought of having one without medication is just awful. While I am on daily preventatives, I haven’t had great luck with them. I hope that new and better medicines are developed.

<em><a href=”http://www.thedailyheadache.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/06/MHAMgiveaway.png”><img class=”alignright wp-image-8336″ src=”http://www.thedailyheadache.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/06/MHAMgiveaway-300×234.png” alt=”MHAMgiveaway” width=”205″ height=”160″ /></a>Reader-submitted stories solely represent the personal point of view, experience, and opinion of the author, not of The Daily Headache or Kerrie Smyres. Follow this link to learn how to <a title=”Migraine &amp; Headache Disorders 30 Things Meme” href=”http://www.thedailyheadache.com/30things”>share YOUR 30 Things</a> about living with a headache disorder.</em>

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30 Things About Skylar’s Life With Chronic Migraine

This is a reader-submitted story.

1. My diagnosis is: Chronic Migraine
2. My migraine attack frequency is: AT LEAST once per week
3. I was diagnosed in: 1995 with Migraine but developed chronic migraine in my early 20s
4. My comorbid conditions include: None that I’ve been diagnosed as having
5. I take magnesium, Saw Palmetto each day for prevention and over the counter PM pain killers to help me sleep through an acute attack. I’ve tried relpax, avamigraine, tonopan, depakote, imitrex, nortriptilene and the list goes on with no success. I’m getting ready to meet with a new neurologist. The last did all he could but the prescription meds did nothing to help me – story of my life.
6. My first migraine attack was: 1995 (15 years old)
7. My most disabling migraine symptoms are: Excruciating Headache, Nausea, Blurred Vision, Depression, Light Sensitivity
8. My strangest migraine symptoms are: Frequent Urination which I experience prior to an attack and sometimes during one.
9. My biggest known migraine triggers are: bananas, not eating on time, physical exertion, sunlight
10. I know a migraine attack is coming on when: I see twinkling lights, a black circle blocks out the field of vision in one of my eyes, I feel Euphoric, I feel depressed, I smell citrus when there’s no citrus present,
11. The most frustrating part about having a migraine attack is: My life has to be put on hold.
12. During a migraine attack, I worry most about: If it’s a whammy the pains too much for me to worry. If it’s not, I worry about being a burden and I worry about everything that needs to be done but I can’t do. Sometimes I worry about dying.
13. When I think about migraine between attacks, I think: Is this it? Have I finally struck upon something that works? or Take your time, don’t over do it, you don’t want to trigger a migraine. N.B. I’m very rarely migraine free.
14. When I tell someone I have migraine, the response is usually: Oh I’m so sorry/I have them too.
15. When someone tells me they have migraine, I think: Honestly – I wonder if they really know what a migraine is. Then I think aww… not another sufferer.
16. When I see commercials about migraine treatments, I think: LIARS!
17. My best coping tools are: My religious beliefs and the support of my family.
18. I find comfort in: reading and mediating on the Bible; praying; attending congregation meetings; low key nights with my hubby; family gatherings – when I can attend; blogging and assisting in volunteer work when I can.
19. I get angry when people say: I have headaches too. You just need to get out more. You need to exercise more.
20. I like it when people say: Tell me what your life with migraine is like. Not for pity, I just want to be understood.
21. Something kind someone can do for me during a migraine attack is: Phone to find out if I need something to eat.
22. The best thing(s) a doctor has ever said to me about migraine is: You have chronic migraine. We need to break the cycle. I never knew that the majority of my headaches (which never stop – literally), were migrainous. My husband and I were on the search for what was wrong with me. That neurologist finally answered our question.
23. The hardest thing to accept about having migraine is: You must work within your limitations.
24. Migraine has taught me: To be empathetic towards others.
25. The quotation, motto, mantra, or scripture that gets me through an attack is: 1 Corinthians 10:13: No temptation has come upon you except what is common to men. But God is faithful, and he will not let you be tempted beyond what you can bear, but along with the temptation he will also make the way out so that you may be able to endure it. and Isaiah 41:10, 13: 10. Do not be afraid, for I am with you. Do not be anxious, for I am your God. I will fortify you, yes, I will help you, I will really hold on to you with my right hand of righteousness.’ 13. For I, Jehovah your God, am grasping your right hand, The One saying to you, ‘Do not be afraid. I will help you.’
26. If I could go back to the early days of my diagnosis, I would tell myself: Find a headache specialist.
27. The people who support me most are: My husband, parents and sister-in-law.
28. The thing I most wish people understood about migraine is: It’s not just a headache. It’s disabling neurological disease.
29. Migraine and Headache Awareness Month is important to me because: Because we need to be understood and we need better treatment plans across the board. Not just one or two patients who happen to strike upon the right doctor.
30. One more thing I’d like to say about life with migraine is: This neurological disease takes so much away from you. It takes your life, your freedom, your self-esteem, your passion and so much more.
MHAMgiveawayReader-submitted stories solely represent the personal point of view, experience, and opinion of the author, not of The Daily Headache or Kerrie Smyres. Follow this link to learn how to share YOUR 30 Things about living with a headache disorder.

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30 Things About Vicki’s Migraines

This is a reader-submitted story.

1. My diagnosis is: Chronic Migraine
2. My migraine attack frequency is: It varies; 12-20 days a month; sometimes more, but never less
3. I was diagnosed in: Junior high school; onset of menses
4. My comorbid conditions include: Prediabetes and hypoglycemia
5. I take ___zero_ medications/supplements each day for prevention and ____one medications/supplements to treat an acute attack
6. My first migraine attack was: Over 30 years ago
7. My most disabling migraine symptoms are: Pain; nausea and visual disturbances
8. My strangest migraine symptoms are: Numbness and tingling in my extremities
9. My biggest migraine triggers are: Monthly menstruation; lack of sleep and bright lights and loud noises 10. I know a migraine attack is coming on when: My neck is sore, a dull ache begins in my head or my extremities begin to feel numb and, without exception, every month before my period begins
11. The most frustrating part about having a migraine attack is: My inability to stop it and how it limits my ability to participate in daily life
12. During a migraine attack, I worry most about: How bad the pain will be and how long it will last
13. When I think about migraine between attacks, I think: How long before the next one
14. When I tell someone I have migraine, the response is usually: Understanding and concern
15. When someone tells me they have migraine, I think: Do you really?
16. When I see commercials about migraine treatments, I think: Will they benefit me? I am having my first Botox treatment for migraine tomorrow morning!
17. My best coping tools are: Rest, a dark room and Maxalt!
18. I find comfort in: Maxalt! And knowing that no matter how bad the pain is, my head is not, like I used to think, just going to explode and I will die!
19. I get angry when people say: Again, really?
20. I like it when people say: Can I do anything to help? and Go lay down, I’ll take care of everything
21. Something kind someone can do for me during a migraine attack is: Just let me do what I need to do to get through it
22. The best thing(s) a doctor has ever said to me about migraine is: Your MRI is clear, you do not have MS like I first suspected
23. The hardest thing to accept about having migraine is: The feeling of helplessness and no definitive reason why
24. Migraine has taught me: I am very lucky, my condition is manageable
25. The quotation, motto, mantra, or scripture that gets me through an attack is: That which does not kill us makes us stronger
26. If I could go back to the early days of my diagnosis, I would tell myself: This is going to be one of many crosses to bear, be grateful you are still around to bear them all
27. The people who support me most are: My husband, children and my best friend
28. The thing I most wish people understood about migraine is: YES, it hurts that bad!
29. Migraine and Headache Awareness Month is important to me because: It helps me feel validated about my condition; it is an important and REAL condition
30. One more thing I’d like to say about life with migraine is: It is a very emotional condition. It can take its toll mentally and rob you of everyday moments. But, as frustrated and helpless as I sometimes feel, I never stop looking for ways to improve my quality of life, reduce my number of headache days per month, or express gratitude that my condition is not life threatening or terminal. So many people face tragedy and life changing diagnoses on a daily basis.

MHAMgiveawayReader-submitted stories solely represent the personal point of view, experience, and opinion of the author, not of The Daily Headache or Kerrie Smyres. Follow this link to learn how to share YOUR 30 Things about living with a headache disorder.