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Shortage of Migraine Drug DHE-45

DHE-45 (dihydroergotamine mesylate), an injectable migraine abortive, is currently in short supply and is on back order at all three labs who make the drug. It looks like the soonest the drug will be available is the end of February, though two of the three manufacturers have given no estimate of it’s return.

Migraine Medications — DHE 45 Injection Shortage from Ellen Schankenberg gives all the details.

If you rely on DHE, call your pharmacy to see if you can scoop up what remains in stock and contact your doctor for alternative medications. Migranal, the nasal spray of dihydroergotamine mesylate, may be an effective alternative.

5 Responses to Shortage of Migraine Drug DHE-45

  1. Kathryn says:

    I JUST had my last dose today. It takes so much out of me, but it has helped 2 out of 3 migraines.

  2. jerry says:

    How can all 3 manufacturers of Dihydroergotamine all be out of stock at the same time? Nobody appears to give a reason for this shortage. Are they just trying to create a panic and drive the prices up higher than they already are? Anyone know WHY for the shortage and out of stock?

  3. Christine Duffie says:

    I don’t understand this because my doctor has a clinic that has people come in twice a day to receive their injection. So I know it’s available. He showed me a pack of 5 ampules. I currently use the nasal spray but he gave me a script for the injection. My pharmacy says won’t be available until January 5th.

  4. Mark says:

    As of today, my phone calls to the companies that make the product and my calls to several pharmacies have informed me that the brand DHE 45 from Valeant and the generic dihydroergotamine mesylate from Perrigo are not available. Release date for the Valeant product was not given; release dates for the Perrigo product are listed as end of December 2016, and first week January 2017. The price quoted for the Valeant product was $14,133.00 for 10 vials (1 mg/ML) at Walgreens and was $16,610.00 for 12 vials at CVS. Those prices are absurd; it is common for insurance companies to pay nothing towards the cost of a “brand” product. The situation is unacceptable; patients are suffering.

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