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Tofooey

Tofu was the latest test subject for determining which legumes are headache triggers for me. I won’t bother trying to replicate this study. The answer is as clear as it was for peanuts, sunflower seeds and black beans.

It seems obvious that I should simply sidestep legumes. (Just had an image of walking past Mr. Peanut on the street and not making eye contact with him.) But it’s not that easy. I’m torn between wanting to find a legume I can trust and honoring my pain-avoidance instinct.

Any suggestions for a smart(er) approach to testing food triggers?

One Response to Tofooey

  1. Sarah says:

    I wish I could be of some help here since I have sooooooo many food triggers and have succeeded at figuring most of them out, thus eliminating a major cause of my migraines.

    I can tell you that I found somel odd twists as I sorted out the matter. To name a few…

    1. Some foods are only triggers for me when I eat them in isolation. When eaten in combination with certain other foods, I don’t have a problem. Example: Rice is a trigger for me unless I eat it with a protein. (This was tricky to figure out, but helpful. I didn’t have to eliminate rice, just combine it.)

    2. Quantity can sometimes be the trigger–i.e., I can eat a little of some things, but not a lot. (This is true for many foods, but by having learned to limit my intake, it’s allowed me to partake of foods I previously thought I had to give up.)

    3. I love bread products–but have had a lot of problems finding items in stores (even health food stores) that don’t contain ingredients that are migraine triggers for me. The worst of it is often the quality of the flour and all the additives in it. I recently resumed doing my own baking. Besides my breakfasts now being more interesting (I’ve perfected a number of recipes for muffins, biscuits and scones) I’ve gained more control over a potential trigger.

    All of the legumes you’ve tested so far are also migraine triggers for me, but as I mentioned in an earlier posting, I am able to consume pinto beans in moderation. I wouldn’t totally give up on legumes, but I can certainly understand wanting to take a break from testing them for awhile.

    Some foods were such strong triggers for me when I tested them years ago, that I haven’t been able to work up the courage to revisit them. My gut just says, “No! Stay away! Danger! Danger!” On the other hand, years ago wheat was such a strong trigger I had to give it up for a couple of years, but now I can consume it in moderation.

    ********
    You’re a big help to me, Sarah! Your journey with food triggers seems long and complex, but I’m so glad that you’ve been able to sort them out.

    Your words of wisdom will be a terrific guide as I try to sort out my food triggers.

    K

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